My Introduction to 'A Thousand and One Recaps'

Re-posted from 1001.recaps.org


So long as you are prepared to admit it, ignorance is an opportunity rather than a weakness.

— Ann Morgan, 31 December 2019

Why this book and why now?

Why do any of us read anything? I have been meaning to read the Arabian Nights, or The Thousand and One Nights, for many years. Whenever I tell anyone that I have an interest in non-linear fiction, they usually mention the nested, story-within-a-story structure for which the tales are famous. In response, I have always said that I would get around to reading the collection “at some point.” Continue reading “My Introduction to 'A Thousand and One Recaps'”

Quoted in the News Shopper

Some good news! Remember the local campaign against propsed feeder schools? The Langley Park Learning Trust responded to the consultation, and have decided not to proceed.
I spoke to Monica Charsley, Bromley and Bexley correspondent at the News Shopper, about the decision:

Robert Sharp, a spokesperson for the Fair Access Langley campaign group, said: “We are delighted with the decision.
“So many people worked hard to raise awareness about the consultation, and the number of people who responded was a factor in the decision.
“But it is also pleasing that the trustees have engaged with and accepted the social, educational and environmental arguments raised by the community.
“However, we remain concerned that the Trust chose to consult in the first place.
“We urge them to be transparent about their reasons for doing so, and to reassure the community that they will not re-consult on this issue in the near future.”

Read the whole thing here.

Discussing #NoToLangleyFeeders with Alexis Conran on TalkRADIO


Yesterday evening (25th January) I was pleased to be invited on to Alexis Conran’s TalkRADIO show to discuss the #NoToLangleyFeeders campaign. Continue reading “Discussing #NoToLangleyFeeders with Alexis Conran on TalkRADIO”

Reviewing PALESTINE +100 on Tor.com

I’m pleased to report that I have written a book review for Tor.com, one of the world’s foremost science fiction / fantasy websites.
The book is Palestine +100, which (according to its publisher, Comma Press) is the first ever anthology of Palestinian science fiction. It features a dozen stories of speculative fiction, all set a century after the establishment of the state of Israel—an event that Palestinians call the Nakba (catastrophe).

The book’s authors seem to be in dialogue with each other. They ask, first, the extent to which their people must let go of their past in order to secure a future; and second, how much their past defines who they are. Moreover: how does the presence of the Israelis and their nation-building project impact on what it means to be Palestinian?

You can read the entire review on Tor.com, which I hope prompts you to read the book.