Evolution of Skydiving Videos

In my youth, I would go skydiving at weekends.  My take-up of the sport was round about the time that digital video was coming onto the consumer market and into the world of freefall.  Most electronics shops sold high-end mini-DV units for four figure sums alongside VHS camcorders.  All units were relatively bulky and you required a homemade helmet with a camera-mount bracket on the front.

The films we produced then were rudimentary.  They were washed out and a bit shaky, and any that were edited were typically very basic montages set to some kind of dance-music sound-track.  Here’s an example I made earlier.

Compare that with this beautiful thing from design studio Betty Wants In, advertising a skydive centre in Melbourne. Its in a different league to what I saw being produced a decade ago, even from the professionals. Chief amongst its virtues is the focus on stillness and calm, and the relative stasis that you achieve in freefall (relative being the operative word). By contrast, when I was doing this sort of thing, the entire culture revolved around speed and the iconography was all cliched lightning bolts and flames. It shows how the practitioners of this relatively new genre have evolved, helped of course by the reduced price and size of HD video.