Hyperverbal

I think ‘hyperverbal’ was precisely the word I wanted to use to describe the work of David Foster Wallace and Neal Stephenson.

I’ve been reading the Creative Commons licenced New Liberal Arts over lunch.  I underlined this quote from Diana Kimball:

Languages are everywhere, and everywhere they are crucial. By expanding the scope of “foreign languages” to include unspoken languages (such as Perl, Ruby, and HTML) and hyperverbal tongues (such as the vocabularies of science, slang, and religion), that scope begins to include tools not just of communication, but of invention.

I think ‘hyperverbal’ was precisely the word I wanted to use to describe the work of David Foster Wallace and Neal Stephenson.  Instead, I came up with “a lustre of geekyness… peppered with idioms and slang.”

2 thoughts on “Hyperverbal”

  1. The writing in Stephenson's debut novel "Snow Crash' was lean and taut. "Cryptonomicon"​ contained fine writing but not the discipline. (A good example of the 'Second System Syndrome' described by Brooks in "The Mythical Man Month".) The first novel of the Baroque Cycle trilogy was enough for me; I'm keeping my energy for finishing Pynchon's "Against The Day".

  2. The writing in Stephenson's debut novel "Snow Crash' was lean and taut. "Cryptonomicon" contained fine writing but not the discipline. (A good example of the 'Second System Syndrome' described by Brooks in "The Mythical Man Month".) The first novel of the Baroque Cycle trilogy was enough for me; I'm keeping my energy for finishing Pynchon's "Against The Day".

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *