Chilcott/Blair

The reason we actually went to war is not the reason we were told we were going to war. The issue of Iraq clearly needs a Frost/Nixon moment, where the concerns of the public are at least acknowledged by the ex-leader at the heart of the controversy.

Unfortunately, a busy week at work meant that Blair’s appearance at the Chilcott Inquiry pretty much passed me by.  After The Event news reports confirmed what we all expected anyway – Mr Blair refused to apologise or admit any wrong-doing.

My take:  Put aside for a moment all the issues of legality, post-war planning, the monstrosity of Saddam’s regim, and oil.  (They are huge issues, admittedly… but put them aside anyway).  We are still left with a central dischord, which is this:  Prime Minister Blair’s actual reason for waging to war, is not the reason we were told we were going to war. This is untenable in a democracy, regardless of the ultimate morality of the conflict, of the death we caused.

We, the people, know this.

Tony Blair knows this.

Moreover, we know he knows this. Moreover moreover, he knows we know this.  And we know he knows we know.  And he knows that we know that he knows.  Ad nauseum. Yet, no apology.  It is an insult to everyone’s intelligence.

The issue of Iraq clearly needs a Frost/Nixon moment, where the concerns of the public are at least acknowledged by the ex-leader at the heart of the controversy.  This is unlikely to ever materialise, which is why this is an issue that will continue to fester for a generation, or more.

1 thought on “Chilcott/Blair”

  1. Well said Rob. I think Iraq hangs over everything the Labour government says and does as it moves towards an election. And I still feel a mixture of despair and fury when I hear Blair speak. I suppose he cannot give an apology because to allow a chink of light and truth into the picture he has created for himself would surely destroy him.

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